Tuesday, 4 February 2014

Crown swirl

Once again, apologies for not having posted anything for so long!

Just a quick one today.  Here are a couple of photos of the crown area of a light density piece I have been working on.  I have paid particular attention to the direction of the hair, and have tried to emulate the natural swirl that appears at the crown area.  I'm quite happy with it.  I think it's about as good as it's possible to be within the limitations of knotting hair onto lace.

This type of attention to detail wouldn't be necessary if the wig was longer, or if it was going to be brushed back over the crown.  But for high definition movie wigs, or even hairpieces for men, which usually are cut shorter and have the crown exposed, this type of detail will be the difference between a natural looking head of hair and something that screams WIG!!!

The crown nearing completion
The finished crown


13 comments:

  1. awesome, now that looks natural.

    ReplyDelete
  2. do you hace any blonds lace fronts you ant to sell ??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really only have the one blonde wig that I have finished, and that one isn't for sale, sorry!

      Delete
  3. Dave,
    I was wondering, are there special tricks when ventilating the crown? Regarding the directions?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This would be easier to illustrate with a drawing, but I will try to describe it. Essentially, there are only six possible directions to ventilate hair due to the hexagon pattern in the lace. For the crown, I mark the area as you can see in the photo. For each section of the crown, I rotate the ventilation direction by one side of the hexagon compared to the hair that surrounds it. So for instance for the bottom section of the crown, instead of ventilating the hair vertically like the hair below it, I will ventilate it at a 60┬║ angle (i.e. on the bottom left side of each hexagon.)

      I continue this rotation of the the angle for all sides of the crown, so that it gives the appearance of swirling away from the surrounding hair.

      Let me know if this makes sense, and if not I will post a drawing...

      Delete
    2. This is very helpful. Thank you.
      So if you go clockwise, in the section left to the bottom section you ventilate the hair up and left/on the upper left side of the hexagons, correct. The next area then would be ventilated straight up?

      Delete
  4. Hey Dave, was just about to start on the crown on my second piece and trying to remember how I did the crown area on my first one by revisiting this blog entry. Did you do a direction change in between each section of the pie diagram? I think I did on my first one and I think it resulted in a very diffused looking whorl.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey, yes - each section rotates to the next side of the hexagon. If that makes sense...

      Delete
  5. Yes, that I know. I think I'm asking a confusing question. Each section goes in a different direction, but inbetween each section did you combine each meeting direction to do a change direction transition to smooth it out? Like super wig maker explains in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hL81f_1IM_s

    Or is this necessary in the crown area?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ah, I see what you mean. No I didn't do that. I don't really find it necessary in any case, but especially so in the crown. The hair swirls over the previous section so the transitions are covered up.

    ReplyDelete
  7. In my subsequent piece I used reverse 2-way knotting for the crown. It was even more freestyle, and had more volume because each section was reversed, but it didn't have as much 'swirl' as this one. Not sure which one I preferred...

    ReplyDelete